XXX Chats

Free sex webcams no credit

30 most intimidating baseball players

In celebration of the new century, The Sporting News brings you Baseball's Greatest Players.

Since 1886, The Sporting News has covered sports in America, from Babe Ruth to Nolan Ryan.

From that unique perspective, and from the rich tradition of The Sporting News archives and baseball heritage, from the thousands of men who have played the game, comes the 100 greatest of them all.

When the American Film Institute announced the hundred greatest films of the 20th century last year, its list was met with respectful applause, although there were some long faces because Buster Keaton and other quintessential comedians weren't recognized.

The Modern Library, on the other hand, lost serious credibility with its selection of the hundred best novels — it turned out that most of the books selected were conveniently available in Modern Library editions, and that women were apparently incapable of writing many of those best novels.

But deciding the best films, novels, or even the greatest dictators of the century (you say Stalin, I say Idi Amin, let's call the whole thing off) is not nearly as perilous as choosing which of baseball's 15,000 players since 1900 belong on the all-time roster.

And yet that is precisely The Sporting News Selects Baseball's 100 Greatest Players has done.

The bible of baseball since 1886 (in fact, it wasn't until 1967 that it even featured another sport on its cover), The Sporting News has clearly had the best seats in the ballpark from which to whittle the choices down, let alone rank them.

The results, while not always surprising — Babe Ruth is first, Willie Mays (who wrote the introduction, which reads more like a thank-you note) is second, Ty Cobb enters the lineup third — are great funtopore over, especially when you run across a name you've never heard of, such as Eddie Collins, who played second base for Connie Mack's Philadelphia Athletics during the early 1900s and was an innocent member of the 1919 Black Sox; Ty Cobb himself, that great misanthropic competitor, considered Collins the greatest ballplayer of all time.Beyond that, the list is sure to provoke the kind of arguments in bars and chat rooms that make such lists worthwhile in the first place.For instance, I certainly accept that Splendid Splinter, Ted Williams, deserves to be in the top ten — he's eighth — but could the editors really not find a spot for his cosmic twin, Joe Di Maggio? Louis Cardinal great Stan Musial, who ranks tenth, truly better than the Yankee Clipper?(With all due respect, I don't recall anybody asking where Stan the Man has gone.) And though the TSN roster does contain all of the usual suspects from yesteryear (Walter Johnson, Lou Gehrig, Tris Speaker, Honus Wagner..know the rest), the editors have wisely added some names from the Negro Leagues — Josh Gibson, Buck Leonard, Cool Papa Bell — many of whom were not allowed to test their skills against Major Leaguers until the second half of the century, if at all.There are, of course, many contemporary players (17 from 1970 to the present), as well as some active players who will surely be enshrined in Cooperstown someday: Barry Bonds, at number 34, is the highest ranking, but you can also find Greg Maddux (39), Roger Clemens (53), and Cal Ripken Jr. And what kind of list would it be today without the inclusion of Mark Mc Gwire (91)?Each entry in The Sporting News Selects is accompanied by the extraordinary photography — both action shots and classic portraits — that readers have come expect from the paper, and there are also short essays, penned by veteran TSN editor Ron Smith, supporting the claim for greatness.What makes this book so much fun to read, though, are the mini lists within most of the entries.The editors asked the selectees, as well as Hall of Fame managers, to make their own all-time selections.Want to know Tom Seaver's (32) most intimidating hitter? Mc Covey, by contrast, thinks that Sandy Koufax (32) was the toughest pitcher he faced.There are also ten all-decade teams to keep a stadiumful of Rotisserie addicts arguing for days. Learn more As the most feared pitcher of all time, Roger Clemens has won more than 350 games in his 20-year baseball career, struck out more than 4,500 batters (the second highest total in the history of the game), and earned a record seven Cy Young awards.

Comments 30 most intimidating baseball players